Plan Your Visit

The Memorial site is oriented east to west, parallel with the coast about 700m inland, and the entrance is at the eastern edge. At the site, you will find a car park, toilet facilities, a picnic area and a free WiFi hotspot. It is approximately an 8-minute walk to the Memorial from the car park following the Memorial Walkway.

Please note there is a small charge to park at the Memorial. Find out how to pay here

Finding a name

The names of the servicemen and women under British command who died on D-Day and during the Battle of Normandy are listed on the Memorial in chronological order according to their date of death.

The names of the 1,746 who died on D-Day itself are inscribed on the D-Day Wall of Memorial Court. Names are recorded by Armed Service: Royal Navy, Army, Royal Air Force, Merchant Navy, and “others”, including Special Agents and War Correspondents. The names of those who lost their lives after D-Day between 7 June and 31 August are inscribed on the columns of the Memorial, in a clockwise direction from Memorial Court.

The Roll of Honour lists the names of all those on the Memorial, as well as their date of death, their column number showing their location on the Memorial as well as historical context and further information about their story in some cases.

The easiest way to find a name during your visit is to download the free British Normandy Memorial App on your smartphone (iOS or Android). This will point you towards the column number where the name is inscribed. The app also includes an interactive map, audio guides, stories about the names on the Memorial and an augmented reality guide of the Normandy coastline.

The Trust is appealing for relatives of the fallen to share stories, pictures, letters and other archive materials connected to their loved ones to be preserved digitally via the app. You can email [email protected], sharing a maximum of 500 words and 5 images and /or archive documents.

Share pictures from your visit with the Trust by tagging @BritishMemorial on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

Accessibility 

Disabled parking is available and is located near the toilets. The British Normandy Memorial is accessible from the car park via the Memorial Walkway via a compacted gravel footpath suitable for wheelchairs and walking frames. It is approximately an 8-minute walk from the car park to the Memorial itself. There are gravel pathways all around the Memorial, but the central Memorial Court and pergola walkways are paved. There are benches throughout the site to rest on during your visit.

The Memorial does not have staff onsite to provide assistance for specific accessibility needs, although we will always endeavour to make your visit as comfortable as possible. If you have any specific concerns please email [email protected].

Group visits

Groups of all sizes are welcome to visit the Memorial. Coach parking is available –find out how to pay here. If your group includes people with additional accessibility requirements please contact us in advance. We would encourage everybody in the group to download the free British Normandy Memorial App before visiting. If you are in a large group be sure to book ahead if you want to eat nearby many of the local restaurants and brasseries get full during high season.

Extending your stay

After your visit to the Memorial there are lots of places to visit locally. The remains of the Mont Fleurie gun battery are located in a private field just next to the Memorial and can be accessed using local roads and footpaths – please follow the local signposts and keep to the paths. The village has a small memorial to the soldiers of the 2nd Battalion of The Hertfordshire Regiment who landed in Ver-sur-Mer and a Sexton self-propelled gun nearby, both close to the beach. There is a newly established walking tour of the village with 10 explanatory panels which takes approximately 90 minutes to complete.
For information on what to do further afield please visit the local tourist information websites listed below.

The Memorial is situated in an area of Normandy with a rich history, stretching from Neolithic times and the Roman occupation of Gaul to one of the defining engagements of the Second World War. Normandy is also famous for its food and local produce, as well as it’s beautiful beaches, wildlife reserves and historical buildings.

For information on where to eat and sleep as well as ideas on what to do after you complete your visit to the British Normandy Memorial visit the local, regional and departmental tourist information websites.

Seulles Terre et Mer
Calvados Attractivité
Normandie Attractivité 

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